Our Services

  • + - How can BDVS assist women?

    The Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) can provide you with support, information and options.

    Whether you are thinking about staying, leaving, aren’t yet sure what you want to do, or worried about a family member or friend, we can help.

    BDVS team members are specialists and have extensive knowledge and experience in the delivery of services, support and advocacy to people experiencing domestic and family violence. We can support you in the community, at home (if safe to do so), via telephone or digital platforms, or in one of our office's at Brisbane North, South or Central.

    BDVS can assist with:

    • information and advice
    • safety planning and assessment
    • advocacy and support
    • coordinated case response
    • safety assessments of your home
    • practical safety upgrades to your home
    • technology and digital safety advice including scans of your devices for spyware or tracking apps
    • support groups
    • court support
    • financial counselling and advocacy
    • support for children and young people
    • programs for men using violence
    • emotional support
    • psycho-education around domestic and family violence.

    BDVS can assist you to access:

    • legal advice and services
    • emergency accommodation
    • emergency transport
    • emergency financial relief
    • ongoing therapeutic support (counselling)
    • longer case management support
    • family and parenting support
    • a multi-disciplinary team to assist you with your safety.

    If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic or family violence, please contact us.

    If you are currently in an emergency situation, call the Police on 000.

    View the BDVS factsheet and general safety planning guide.

    Other numbers that may be helpful for your situation include:

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    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service acknowledges and pays respect to the traditional custodians and the Elders both past and present on whose land we walk, work and live.

    We recognise that a strong cultural identity is essential to strong mental health, social and emotional wellbeing and strong community health.

    All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people deserve healthy and respectful relationships and the end of domestic and family violence in urban, rural and remote communities.

    As the Brisbane Service for all people affected by domestic and family violence (DFV), we recognise the need for targeted responses to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander domestic and family violence.

    Research shows that family violence disproportionately affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and that the impacts of colonisation and inter-generational trauma contribute to the prevalence of DFV in their communities.

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service works in collaboration with specialist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services to support culturally informed, locally-led, strength-based approaches to domestic and family violence affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples where mainstream domestic and family violence responses are unsuitable or need aiding.

    Services we work in conjunction with include:

    If you are in an unhealthy relationship or think you might be experiencing domestic or family violence, please contact us for support.

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    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) recognises that people with disabilities are disproportionately affected by domestic and family violence. The 2016 Personal Safety Survey found that people with a disability or a long-term health condition were twice as likely to have experienced intimate partner violence when cohabiting.

    Read the Easy English Booklet about Domestic and Family Violence from WWILD.

    Women with disability seek support for domestic and family violence (DFV) for similar reasons to other people, however, they face additional barriers. View video from the national peak body Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA) on women with disability speaking about the fundamental human right to live free from all forms of violence

    BDVS identifies and pursues ‘good practice’ to ensure people with disabilities are supported with their safety and other immediate needs.

    BDVS acknowledges the importance of coordinated multi-agency input on domestic and family violence responses for women with disabilities. BDVS is the lead agency of the Brisbane High Risk Team and works alongside WWILD who specialise in supporting women with intellectual disabilities, and other services to support women with disabilities to live free from abuse.

    BDVS can engage AUSLAN interpreters for deaf people and National Relay Service and TTY options are always available.

    For a list of disability advocacy services, please visit WWILD.

    A review commissioned by the Queensland Government found that people with disabilities are subjected to DFV for significantly longer periods of time, experience multiple forms of abuse and have less pathways to safety and justice.

    Barriers can include:

    • the abusive partner may also be a carer
    • fear of losing custody of children
    • community attitudes
    • social isolation
    • communication and accessibility challenges.

    Compounding challenges for women with disabilities who experience domestic and family violence, include, race, age, gender and sexual orientation.

    Aboriginal people experience disability at a higher rate than non-Indigenous Australians. Based on the 2015 SDAC, disability rates for Indigenous males and females were similar (23% and 25%, respectively) and more than half (58%) of Indigenous Australians aged 55 and over were living with some form of disability and 18% had severe or profound disability. Indigenous Australians are also disproportionately affected by domestic and family violence in Australia.

    Although limited, research also suggests that parents with disability are disproportionately represented in the child protection system in Australia due to misconceptions and systemic discrimination. View video from Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA) on Why is the right to have children important for women with disability?

    A further challenge for women with disabilities is that the unemployment rate of working-age (15–64) people with disability is twice that of those without a disability. This higher unemployment rate presents financial barriers for women experiencing domestic and family violence.

    If you reside in Brisbane and are experiencing abuse in your home, contact us for support.

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    Everyone has the right to safety, including in their relationships. This right is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    Read the Easy English Booklet about Domestic and Family Violence from WWILD.

    Domestic and family violence (DFV) can happen to anyone and there are services available to help, no matter your visa status.

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) can provide information about your rights to safety, the support you can access and your options if you have been experiencing abuse at home from a partner or family member.

    If you reside in the Brisbane region and think you might be experiencing domestic or family violence, please contact us for a confidential discussion about your situation.

    BDVS works closely with interpreting service, TIS National so you can request an interpreter when speaking to our workers about your situation. For information in your language, visit the Immigrant Women’s Support Service.

    We recognise the complexities of domestic and family violence in CALD communities and acknowledge the benefits of cultural connections and understandings between practitioners and CALD people experiencing family violence. As a result, BDVS continues to strengthen our partnerships with specialist CALD services such as the Immigrant Women’s Support Service and Refugee and Immigration Legal Service. We regularly make consenting referrals to our partners.

    As the specialist DFV Service for the Brisbane region, we stay up to date with best practice for supporting people from CALD backgrounds and recognise the need for accessible information and culturally safe approaches for supporting people from CALD backgrounds who are experiencing domestic or family violence.

    There are many barriers for people from CALD backgrounds in seeking support for domestic and family violence. Barriers compiled by Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety include:

    • distrust of law enforcement and other state agencies
    • language barriers and inconsistent access to interpreters, which is exacerbated in regional areas (interpreters may be known to the victim or perpetrator)
    • not considering the violence as serious enough or not having information which would allow them to recognise domestic violence
    • fear of losing custody of their children if they report violence
    • loss of financial stability without support from the spouse
    • not having accessible information about navigating service systems
    • visa conditions and employment restrictions
    • community stigma, social ostracism and isolation
    • pressures to keep the family together
    • economic barriers and lower access to resources when leaving violent situations.

    The Australian Government has developed a Family Safety Pack for people coming to Australia, which includes information about Australia’s laws regarding domestic and family violence, sexual assault and forced marriage, and a woman’s right to be safe.

    Find information on payments, health care and services for people new to living in Australia on the Services Australia website.

    If you reside in Brisbane and are experiencing abuse in your home, contact us for support.

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  • + - Achieving safer families

    Achieving safer families is our goal at Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS). Every person has a right to safety and BDVS supports families of all kinds to live free from abuse.

    Child/adolescent to parent abuse can be defined as a ‘Pattern of aggressive, abusive and violent acts across a prolonged period of time’. This type of abuse predominantly impacts the female protective caregiver and siblings. At BDVS we understand that young boys often use power and control after experiencing or witnessing domestic or family violence (DFV) in their family or origin.

    Experiencing adolescent to parent abuse can be confusing and confronting. Parents can feel ashamed, disappointed and humiliated, and blame themselves for the situation, while minimising their child's abuse to others.

    At BDVS, we recognise this as a real experience for many families, so we offer the Safer Families Initiative in partnership with Carinity Talera's 'ReNew' program.

    The Safer Families Initiative works with:

    • young males aged 12–17 years
    • their female protective caregivers
    • fathers who want to engage to make positive changes around abusive behaviours (where safe to do so).

    View the Safer Families Initiative factsheet.

    Our innovative service provides:

    • a coordinated case response to young males and their female protective caregiver
    • evidence based (Break4Change) group or one on one sessions around responding to adolescent to parent abuse
    • ongoing risk assessment and safety planning
    • a coordinated case response with other support services
    • intake, assessment and referral into the Carinity Talera 'ReNew' program which provides follow on therapeutic support.

    Support is also available for affected siblings (see Children and Young Person's program).

    Carinity Talera’s 'ReNew' program provides the opportunity for mother’s and son’s to engage in trauma informed, attachment focused therapy, from a position of safety and preparedness. Carinity Talera provides focused individual and family therapy and opportunities for group work participation to support mother’s, son’s, and siblings aged 12–17 years.

    Families are eligible for the Safer Families Initiative when there is:

    • a young male (12–17 years) using violence in the home towards the female protective caregiver
    • family residing within Brisbane City Council catchment (BDVS’ catchment)
    • an experience of DV for the family.

    Please contact us, Monday to Friday from 9am–5pm.

    For Referring agencies: please complete a referral form.

    Direct support lines – Monday to Friday from 9am–5pm:

    • Mothers and Female Caregivers – please phone 0400 218 639
    • Male Youth Support (young men 12–17 years) – please phone 0437 149 759.

    If you are in crisis, you can contact us anytime.

  • + - Children and young people

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) provides support to children, young people and their protective caregivers.

    BDVS provides support to children aged 6–17 years who have been impacted by domestic and family violence, in the form of 'one to one' or group psycho-education.

    For our group component, the goal is to provide children with an opportunity to have a social learning experience and form secure connection through a trauma informed evidence-based art and play based program.

    BDVS also provides educational and peer support to mothers or female protective care givers of children and young people who have experienced domestic and family violence. The aim is understand trauma, the impact on children and strategies for moving forward to support children and young people in the form of an evidenced based program.

    Eligibility for the Children and Young Person’s program includes:

    • children, young people and/or primary carer residing within Brisbane City Council catchment (BDVS’ catchment)
    • children, young people and/or primary carer who have experienced or witnessed domestic and family violence.

    Please contact us Monday to Friday from 9am–5pm.

    For Referring agencies: please complete a referral form.

    If you are in crisis, you can contact us anytime.

  • + - Working with men to keep women safe

    Integral to the safety and protection of women and children, is justice and accountability for men who use violence in their relationships.

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) has programs that work with men using violence in their relationships. This work supports the safety of women and children and affords men the opportunity to make change and be accountable for their abusive behaviour. Through supporting people who experience abuse and working with men who use violence, BDVS provides a holistic response to domestic and family violence in the community.

    If you are using violence against a current or former partner and would like support to stop, DV Connect Mensline can assist.

    The Brisbane Domestic Violence Service, Men’s Domestic Violence Offender Program (MDVOP)

    The 27-week, evidence-based Duluth program is an open-ended mandated group designed for men using violence in their relationships. It is facilitated by specialist domestic and family violence (DFV) practitioners who are trained and supervised under the Duluth practice principles and model of intervention for men using violence within their relationships (See Duluth's Equality Wheel and Power and Control Wheel).

    Under the supervision of statutory authorities, the MDVOP is offered to male offenders who have perpetrated violence against their female intimate partners.

    The program has at its core the belief that women and children have a right to safety, and that perpetrators of violence must be held to account for their behaviour and provided the opportunity for change.

    Our Women’s Advocate provides support to women whose current or former partners are on Program. This support is delivered as required and can include information and referral, safety planning and assessment, advocacy and emotional support.

    Please note, that self-referral is not available for the MDVOP. Brisbane Domestic Violence Service receives referrals for men using violence from Child Safety, Queensland Corrective Services Probation and Parole and the Department of Justice and Attorney General Queensland Drug and Alcohol Court.

    The Brisbane Domestic Violence Service Men’s Domestic Violence Education Program (MDVEP)

    The 10-week, evidence-based, open-ended voluntary group has been designed as an early intervention initiative to provide men with access to information, advice and education around domestic and family violence and equal relationships using the Duluth Equality Wheel Framework, facilitated by specialist DFV practitioners who are trained and supervised under the Duluth practice principles and model of intervention for men using violence within their relationships.

    In Brisbane, there is high demand for consent-based behaviour change programs from men wanting to:

    • access information and education around using non–violent behaviours in intimate relationships
    • understand their responsibilities as a respondent on a Domestic Violence Order (DVO) and the legal ramifications of breaching domestic and family violence orders
    • appreciate the ramifications of continuing to use violence within their relationships.

    BDVS' MDVEP will enable men wanting to make positive change around abusive behaviours to access an evidence-based program in the Brisbane region.

    For men who have only recently been identified within the system as perpetrating violence within the relationship or past relationship, this program provides psycho education and an opportunity for them to explore their behaviours and seek help and/or support from services and agencies.

    The program also supports men who may later be mandated into an offender program to have an opportunity to gain insight into the Duluth framework and concepts, and to become group ready.

    Our Women’s Advocate provides emotional support, risk assessment, safety planning, information and referral to current or ex-partners enrolled in the program as required, for the male attending the program.

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service receives referrals for participants from Department of Justice and Attorney General Court Link Program (Court Link Program), Queensland Police Service Brisbane Northside vulnerable persons unit (VPU).

    Men’s Court Information

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service has men’s court information at Sandgate Magistrates Court.

    Our Men’s Worker receives a court list and then approaches men at court, explaining the range of supports our service can provide. Support can include:

    • information on options in relation to the Domestic Violence Order (DVO)
    • information on the court process (ie. what to expect in the courtroom)
    • services available (ie. duty lawyers, interpreters, Mensline and various other community services)
    • understanding what domestic violence is and how it relates to their situation
    • understanding the effects of domestic violence on the aggrieved and children.

    Our Men’s Worker works in collaboration with court staff, the Magistrate, Police Prosecutors, Caboolture DV Women's Support Workers, security staff and Duty Lawyers to make sure all people who attend are protected and processed through the system appropriately.

    Please note our men’s court information service is only available at Sandgate Magistrates Court.

    Brisbane High Risk Team

    BDVS is also the lead agency for the Brisbane region High Risk Team (HRT). The HRT is a team of multi-agency services including Queensland Corrective Services, Queensland Police Service, Child Safety, Department of Justice and Attorney General (Courts), Department of Housing & Public Works, Youth Justice, Queensland Health and Victims Assist Queensland. The HRT works in a case coordination model sharing information and developing a single multi agency support plan, to respond to the safety needs of individuals and ensure wherever possible accountability for those who are using violence within the relationship.

    If you are using violence against a current or former partner and would like support to stop, DV Connect Mensline can assist.

  • + - LGBTQI+ people

    Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) supports people affected by domestic and family violence in the Brisbane region.

    Research shows that domestic violence is underreported but prevalent in the LGBTQI+ community and that the tactics of abuse can be unique from other relationships, such as threats to ‘out’ or ‘outing’ a partner to their family, friends or colleagues, threatening to or exposing a partner’s HIV status, or humiliating a partner based on their sexuality, gender identity or intersex status.

    BDVS recognises the complexities of domestic and family violence in LGBTQI+ relationships and acknowledges that we are not experts in LGBTQI+ relationships. However, we are committed to keeping up to date with best practice and linking in with specialist LGBTQI+ services where needed and have a long history of supporting LGBTQI+ individuals experiencing domestic and family violence.

    Specialist services and information for people identifying as part of the LGBTQI+ community include:

    The Queensland Police Service have LGBTI Liaison Officers that you can access by calling PoliceLink on 131 444 and requesting to speak with an LGBTI Liaison Officer. Find out more about the QPS LGBTI Liaison Program.

    BDVS can assist you by providing support, information and options. Whether you are thinking about staying, leaving, or aren’t yet sure what you want to do, or if you’re worried about a family member or friend, we can provide you with support and information about increasing your safety, refuges, Domestic Violence Protection Orders (DVPO’s) and more.

    BDVS team members are specialists and have extensive knowledge and experience in the delivery of services, support and advocacy to people experiencing domestic and family violence. We can support you in the community, at home (if safe to do so), via telephone or digital platforms or in one of our office's at Brisbane North, South or Central.

    We can assist with:

    • information and advice
    • safety planning and assessment
    • advocacy and support
    • coordinated case response
    • safety assessments of your home
    • practical safety upgrades to your home
    • technology and digital safety advice including scans of your devices for spyware or tracking apps
    • support groups
    • court support
    • financial counselling and advocacy
    • support for children and young people
    • programs for men using violence
    • emotional support
    • psycho-education around domestic and family violence.

    We can assist you to access:

    • legal advice and services
    • emergency accommodation
    • emergency transport
    • emergency financial relief
    • ongoing therapeutic support (counselling)
    • longer case management support
    • family and parenting support
    • a multi-disciplinary team to assist you with your safety.

    If you reside in the Brisbane region and have been experiencing abuse in your relationship, please contact us.

    To find an LGBTI Liaison Officer in your area, refer to the QPS list.

    If you are currently in an emergency situation, call the Police on 000.

  • + - About us

    The Brisbane Domestic Violence Service (BDVS) is a free and confidential service for people in the Brisbane region who are affected by domestic and family violence.

    BDVS offers a holistic planned support and crisis response through to 'safe and stable'. We work with people in various stages of their lives and do not make decisions for people or tell them what to do. No matter whether a person has left a relationship or is still in a relationship, we can provide support.

    Visit the contact us page for more information on our teams and operating hours.

    Visit the support page for a list of what we can help you to access.

    If you are currently in an emergency situation call the Police on 000.

    Our values

    BDVS’ goal is to support woman and children to reach a stage where they are safe and free from fear of domestic and family violence. We provide a range of services, including information and referral, crisis support, practical assistance, advocacy and emotional support.

    We work to provide a safe environment in which people can access our services, providing support in the way that best meets their individual needs.

    BDVS employs an integrated approach both internally for families, women and children and externally with other organisations committed to the same goals. Our service is based on the beliefs that:

    • domestic and family violence is a violation of human rights and is unacceptable in any form
    • violence in any form is a crime and should not be tolerated by society
    • women and children are predominantly victims of domestic and family violence
    • all family members have a right to safety in the community and where they reside
    • all individuals experiencing domestic and family violence have a right to be treated with respect, dignity and with a non-judgemental attitude
    • all individuals experiencing domestic and family violence have the right to choose what options they pursue to address the violence.

    View the short film on how the team responded to the Covid-19 Pandemic in early 2020.

    Investment

    BDVS is funded by the Queensland Government for the provision of services.

    People who flee their home to escape domestic and family violence often leave without the basics such as food, clothing and phone credit. While BDVS is a funded, non-government organisation, we rely on the community to help us provide some of the basic necessities to women and children fleeing domestic and family violence. Donations are always appreciated and those over $2 are tax deductible.

    Governance

    BDVS is an activity of Micah Projects. Visit the Micah Projects website for more information on governance.

    The Micah Projects Board comprises a diverse membership, reflecting a broad range of professional expertise as well as a commitment to Micah Projects' vision, mission and values.